Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Who Do We Think We Are?!?



MAW attended the screening of Who Does She Think She Is?, part of the Columbus International Film + Video Festival. The film was well-rounded, documenting not only the struggles and sacrifices of women and mother artists, but also the difference that can be made with the support of family and community. Artist Janis Wunderlich and the filmmaker's sister (who lives in Columbus) were both on hand for a Q&A afterwards. I enjoyed how down-to-earth and open they were.

Sadly, the filmmaker, Pamela T. Boll, is now living the message of the film: the arts are male-dominated, and women are fighting all odds to succeed. She cannot find a distributor for the film, even though it is getting rave reviews. Evidently, "there is not enough interest in the subject matter."

So prove them all wrong! Go to the website, sign up, buy the DVD when it's released, host or attend a screening -- whatever you've got to do to support the film and get the message out!

During the Q&A, Melissa pointed out the film was started in 2005, the same year as our group! The phrase "birthing the art" was used many times during the film, and the name of our show in 2006 was "Birthing the Artist." We thought this was a cool coincidence.

10 comments:

TooTightPonyTailGirl said...

It was wonderful to see the film with you all. That in and of itself made my heart swell. Who knew that others were tapping into the same current - others so far away trying to offer a voice for Mother Artists while we were trying to find our voices. I loved the film, though it was bittersweet. I have been waiting for things to get easier somehow, but this didn't ring true for the artists in the film. Each situation had a different set of difficulties and I realized that difficult or not does not determine who makes art. You just do it because you must.

Sharon H. Bell said...

So much to process...
I am very grateful for having the chance to see this wonderful film.

Alissa said...

It was heartbreaking to see families being pulled apart by a spouse unwilling to accept his partner's path in life. But it was also reassuring to see other families where the spouse values his partner's calling, and the children are happy to rise up and support their mothers -- proud of them, and being self-assured in their own paths because of it.

Even though it was bittersweet, I never felt there were regrets. And that's ultimately what I took from the film: no regrets for following your heart.

I am so grateful to have had the chance to see the film with you all!

Mollie said...

Seeing that movie with all of you was like a big group hug. I can still feel everyone's arms around my back.
I really loved the special relationships the mother artists had with their children. Despite the harder times, they had wonderful children who looked up to and admired their mothers.

moogan said...

It was truelly inspiring to watch this film. To watch it with all of you, knowing that surrunding me where a diverse group of talented artist, women and mothers filled me with much joy.
You each serve as such a weatlh of knowledge and inspiration. I'm so glad Sharon asked to start coming to the meetings.

MG Canedo said...

The film showed me that WE can do this, ART, it's not just a dream it's a way of life and truly breath. I'm graceful to be surrounded by this women artists. Thanks!!!

Star Baker said...

Amen sisters! I was quite inspired to take steps and live my dreams whatever they may be, wherever they may lead me. May this film step out and inspire more and more folks-- men and women. Thanks for sharing this with me!

Wendy said...

I found that the individual stories inspiring and was particularly touched by Maye's experience. I still couldn't help but feel a little discouraged that this conversation is still going on and is necessary twenty years since I have been in arts school and it was probably discussed for nearly 20 years before that. As parenting becomes more and more a partnership I remain hopeful that it will be different some day.

I was also impressed by the relationship that the mother's had with their children. It was heartwarming to hear them speak of their mother's positive influence in their lives.

I feel very fortunate to seen this film, especially with such a positive and supportive group of women artists.

Thanks everyone.

Wendy said...

I found that the individual stories inspiring and was particularly touched by Maye's experience. I still couldn't help but feel a little discouraged that this conversation is still going on and is necessary twenty years since I have been in arts school and it was probably discussed for nearly 20 years before that. As parenting becomes more and more a partnership I remain hopeful that it will be different some day.

I was also impressed by the relationship that the mother's had with their children. It was heartwarming to hear them speak of their mother's positive influence in their lives.

I feel very fortunate to seen this film, especially with such a positive and supportive group of women artists.

Thanks everyone.

Wendy said...

oops sorry for the double post-- I guess that's just how much I mean it!